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Results for search "Exercise: Misc.".

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TUESDAY, Jan. 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Americans, get up out of that chair and get moving.

If everyone between 40 and 85 years of age were active just 10 minutes more a day, it could save more than 110,000 U.S. lives a year, a large study reports.

"Our proje...

Support from family and friends, along with exercise and sufficient sleep, have helped protect teens' mental health during the pandemic, new research shows.

The study also found that teen girls have been more likely than boys to suffer mental distress during the pandemic.

For the study, researchers analyzed data gathered from more than 3,000 participants, aged 11 to 14, in the

When older people cut back on physical activity, their risk of type 2 diabetes rises. But walking regularly can help, a new study suggests.

The more steps you take -- and the more intensely you walk -- the lower your odds for type 2 diabetes, researchers found.

To assess the link between walking and diabetes risk...

MONDAY, Jan. 24, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Worrying can take a toll on your psyche, but new research suggests that when middle-aged men fret too much, they face a higher risk for developing diabetes, heart disease or stroke down the road.

And this increase in risk is on par with the health risks linked to

When American kids do downhill skiing or snowboarding, they almost always wear a helmet, their parents say, but they're far less likely to do so when cruising down a neighborhood hill on a sled.

That puts them at risk for serious head injuries, experts warn.

“Because sledding is so common, parents may overloo...

Your heart is in an incredibly vulnerable state if you've suffered a heart attack or are fighting heart failure, and cardiac rehabilitation could be an important part of your recovery.

Unfortunately, not enough older folks appear to be taking advantage of this life-saving therapy.

Fewer than one in 10 eligible Medicare beneficiaries get recommended heart failure rehab treatments, th...

THURSDAY, Jan. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

"Prolonged TV viewing, which involves i...

Folks who've had a tough case of COVID-19 shouldn't hit the gym for basketball or an aerobics class without getting checked out by their doctor first, according to the American College for Sports Medicine.

The disease wracks the body in ways that can be tough on athletes, especially if they develop

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • January 20, 2022
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  • Shoveling snow may trigger a heart attack if you're not careful, especially if you already have risk factors, an expert warns.

    The combination of shoveling and cold weather can cause your arteries to spasm and constrict, explained Dr. Sam Kazziha, chief of cardiovascular...

    It's a familiar trope of TV and movies -- a couple is engaged in passionate sex when the guy's heart suddenly gives out.

    "Usually it's a middle-aged man. Usually he's cheating with somebody else. It's funny, there's this myth in our mind that this can happen," said cardiologist Dr. Martha Gulati, who refers to the concept as the "Hollywood heart attack."

    But ardor simply isn't that ...

    A few hours of exercise a week may help slow Parkinson's disease, even if it's just moderate activity such as walking or gardening, a new study suggests.

    The key is to be consistent, the researchers found.

    "Although medications can provide people with Parkinson's some symptom relief, they haven't been shown to slow the progression of the disease," said study author Dr. Kazuto Tsukit...

    Beating cancer is a huge feat, but how survivors live their lives afterwards also influences their longevity. A new study shows those who sit too much and are not physically active are much more likely to die early from cancer or any other cause than those who are more active.

    Data on c...

    Exercise helps you stay fit, hale and hearty, and researchers say it may also help you stave off dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Now they have a better understanding of the hidden benefits that aid the brain.

    Older folks who are more physically active have higher levels of a protein that promotes better communication between the brain's synapses, a new study reports.

    "Synapses are...

    Many parents struggle with the decision to let their kids play tackle football or other contact sports due to the risk of concussions and long-term brain diseases that may occur with repeated head blows.

    Now, new...

    It's clear that these last couple of years have been tough for a lot of people.

    So now that it’s the week when people make New Year’s resolutions, go easy on yourself.

    If you’d like to make a resolution, start small, the American Psychological Association (APA) suggests. By small, the goal should be one you think you can keep.

    For example, if you want to eat healthier...

    While some plastic surgeons recommend no exercise for weeks after breast augmentation, new research suggests the ban may not be necessary.

    A new clinical trial found that women who resumed exercise after one week off did not have more complicati...

    Don't let a picture-perfect snowfall turn deadly.

    Shoveling snow can cause heart attacks or sudden cardiac arrest in folks with heart conditions and even in those who are unaware that they have heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

    "Shoveli...

    Give yourself and your loved ones the gifts of health and safety this holiday season, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

    The agency outlines 12 ways to do that, beginning with a reminder that washing your hands with soap and clean running water for at least 20 seconds helps prevent the spread of germs. That precaution is particularly important as the Omicron var...

    This time of year can be hard on the heart.

    The United States has more heart attack deaths between Christmas and New Year's Day than at any other time of year, so the American Heart Association (AHA) offers some holiday health tips.

    "The holidays are a busy, often stressful, time for most of us," said Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, volunteer president of the

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  • December 12, 2021
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  • Regular physical activity has all sorts of benefits, and now researchers say it may help ward off serious pneumonia.

    Until now, it wasn't clear how exercise affected the risk of pneumonia, an infection of the lung tissue usually caused by bacteria or viruses. To find out, researchers ana...

    Dirty air could cancel out some of the brain benefits of exercise, a new study suggests.

    "Physical activity is associated with improved markers of brain health in areas with lower air pollution," said study author Melissa Furlong. "However, some beneficial effects essentially disappeared for vigorous physical activity in areas with the highest levels of air pollution." Furlong is an envi...

    College students are not bouncing back from the changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, a troubling new study finds.

    Researchers were surprised to find that one year after the start of the pandemic, college students were still less active and more at risk for depression even as social restrictions were lifted and many were vaccinated.

    While the new study focused on the experien...

    A heart condition, myocarditis, has been found in a number of U.S. college athletes who have had COVID-19, a new study finds.

    Myocarditis has also been linked in some young people to the COVID vaccine. But the odds are far greater that this inflammation of the heart muscle will occur in those who get COVID infection itself, experts said.

    "We're still learning about how the vir...

    NBA great Michael Jordan had a special ritual he would follow before every free throw: He would assume a shoulder-width stance, spin the basketball in his hands, bounce the ball three times, and then spin the ball once more while focusing on the rim before finally taking his shot.

    Now, new research suggests similar routines could improve your sports performance, whether you're an amateur ...

    Seniors, looking for a way to stay mentally quick and physically strong? Start scrubbing.

    Researchers from Singapore say housework may be a key to keeping your brain sharp as you age.

    Their new study found that in older adults, cleaning house was tied to a better memory and attention span, a...

    Becoming a couch potato as you get older goes against evolution and puts your health at risk, a new study suggests.

    Humans have evolved to be active in their later years, and staying active can protect against heart disease and a number of other serious health problems, according to researchers at Harvard.

    "It's a widespread idea in Western societies that as we get older, it's norma...

    A new study is highlighting yet another consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic: It has likely made it even harder for kids with obesity to manage their weight.

    The findings, researchers said, are no surprise. Many adults, faced with normal life being upended during the pandemic, have seen changes on the bath...

    People suffering from dangerous abnormal heart rhythms can take matters into their own hands and figure out what is triggering their episodes, researchers report.

    Folks with atrial fibrillation (a-fib) were able to reduce their episodes of the irregular heartbeat by 40% by identifying and then avoiding the substances or activities that caused their heart to go herky-jerky, according to fi...

    Your daily cup of joe might be a quick pick-me-up, but it comes with a mixed bag of good and not-so-good effects on your health, a new study reports.

    Drinking coffee helps people stay more active, but it also significantly robs some of sleep, researchers say.

    And while java doesn't seem to cause irregular rhythms in the upper chamber of the heart, it can cause the lower chamber...

    Long COVID is rare in college athletes, but those who have had COVID-19 should see a doctor if they have chest pain during activity, the authors of new study advise.

    The extent and effects of persistent symptoms in athletes after COVID-19 infection have been unclear, so researchers went searching for answers.

    "For the vast majority of athletes, this study shows that a return to play...

    Arm and shoulder pain are common for women after breast cancer surgery, and beginning a supervised exercise program soon afterwards can go a long way to easing the discomfort, new research suggests.

    As the team of British investigators explained, restricted shoulder movement and chronic pain or swelling in the armpit area can really impact a patient's recovery and quality of life.

    ...

    Call it the great pandemic sit-down.

    As COVID-19 turned daily commutes into shuffles between rooms at home, and Netflix replaced time spent at the gym or playing sports, Americans have been sitting a lot more. Now a new study suggests it may be putting their mental health at risk.

    "We knew COVID was going to affect our behavior and what we could do in lots of weird, funky ways that ...

    Dr. Kim Huffman, an avid runner, gets a fair amount of guff from friends about the impact that her favorite exercise has on her body.

    "People all the time tell me, 'Oh, you wait until you're 60. Your knees are going to hate you for it'," Huffman said. "And I'm like, 'That's ridiculous'."

    Next time the topic comes up, Huffman is well-armed: An extensive British analysis of prior stud...

    Modern Americans get much less physical activity than their forebearers did 200 years ago, and increasing reliance on technology is a major reason why.

    That's the finding from researchers who used data on falling body temperature and changing metabolic rates in the United States to measure de...

    As basketball fans crammed into stadiums, U.S. counties with universities that hosted "March Madness" games saw a jump in COVID-19 cases earlier this year, new research shows.

    "Counties that are home to universities that participated in NCAA March Madness saw a temporary increase in COVID-19 cases beginning eight days following the tournament and peaking 24 days after the tournament, rela...

    Just a few hours a week of moderate exercise may reduce your risk of cancer, a new study suggests.

    If Americans got the recommended five hours a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, more than 46,000 cancer cases could be prevented in the United States each year, according to the report.

    The study authors said that 3% of all cancer cases in U.S. adults aged 30 and older from...

    A new study may allay concerns that strenuous exercise could up the risk for developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an incurable neurological disease.

    No evidence of rising ALS risk was seen among adults who routinely work up a sweat by playing team sports or engaging in heavy gym workouts. Nor was increased ALS risk associated with less intense leisure activities, such as runnin...

    Days in the saddle can be risky, with horseback riding a potentially deadly activity, according to a new study.

    "Hospital admission risk from horseback riding is higher than football, auto and motorcycle racing, and skiing," the study authors noted. Chest injuries are most common among riders, but head and neck injuries are the deadliest.

    The findings show that "equestrian-related i...

    Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

    The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

    The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children a...

    Many American arthritis sufferers aren't getting any exercise despite its benefits for reducing pain and improving their quality of life, new research shows.

    Sixty-seven percent of U.S. adults with arthritis engaged in physical activity in the past month, most often walking, according to a new data analysis ...

    You can add obesity and its related health risks to the long list of threats posed by climate change, researchers report.

    In a new review, researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia outlined the association between climate change and obesity.

    As global temperatures increase, people may become less physically active and less able to burn excess fat, putting them at incr...

    If you intend to run, bike or put in a Zumba video after work, plan on doing it sooner rather than later.

    A workout that ends a couple of hours before bedtime should help you fall asleep, while one that's closer to bedtime could have you counting a lot of sheep.

    "Overall, our analysis showed that when exercise ended two hours before bedtime, there were sleep benefits, including the ...

    Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

    "Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

    Strength training can help you lose weight, Australian researchers report.

    Their new study reports you can lose a percentage of body fat through strength training alone that is similar to weight loss through cardio or aerobics.

    "A lot of people think that if you want to lose weight, you need to go out and run," said researcher Mandy Hagstrom, an exercise physiologist and senior lect...

    Exercise may help reduce symptoms of a common sleep disorder and improve brain function, a small study finds.

    Exercise training could be a useful supplemental treatment for people with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, the research showed. The condition is characterized by loud snoring and disrupted breathing and can raise the risk for heart disease, stroke and cognitive decline...

    Trying to fit soccer or Little League into your son's busy schedule? Canadian researchers offer some compelling reasons to do so.

    Little boys who play sports are less apt to be anxious or depressed later in childhood and more likely to be active in their early teens, according to the University of Montreal study.

    "We wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in sch...

    People with high blood pressure that doesn't respond to treatment may have more success by following the DASH diet and joining a supervised diet and exercise program, a new study suggests.

    DASH is short for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — a regimen rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and limited salt.

    Duke University researchers found it can help people wi...

    COVID-19 shouldn't keep budding athletes on the sidelines. But it's critical to keep them safe from the coronavirus while playing sports.

    The National Athletic Trainers' Association has some timely tips.

    COVID vaccines for those 12 and older have been a game changer for many families. Being fully vaccinated can make returning to sports safer, the association said.

    But for kids...

    Eating well and exercising regularly can be a challenge for anyone. But for those with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disabilities, that challenge is exponentially greater.

    Many young men and women with autism and intellectual disabilities face a significantly higher risk for obesity, and all the health complications that follow.

    Yet, a small, new pilot study suggests...

    Insulin resistance can make you more than twice as likely to develop major depression, even if you haven't developed full-blown diabetes, a new study reports.

    Initially healthy people who later developed prediabetes were 2.6 times more likely to come down with major depression during a nine-year follow-up period, according to the findings.

    "The insulin-resistant folks had two to thr...

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